less is more
15min_records

antoniogonzalezart:

Matt Connors

antoniogonzalezart:

Matt Connors

(Source: theories-of)

83 notes

andren:

Cinamon_07 (by Eye magazine)

andren:

Cinamon_07 (by Eye magazine)

(via layer13)

74 notes

The Cubism filter

The Cubism filter

1 note

landscape

landscape

0 notes

White Painting, 1951, Robert Rauschenberg

White Painting, 1951, Robert Rauschenberg

1 note

It was only when the metaphysical implications of abstraction—first evinced in Malevich’s Black Square–began to intermingle with the implications of the Duchampian Readymade that the process of undermining the hegemony of painting would begin. The first significant postmodern elaboration came in 1951 when Robert Rauschenberg created White Painting, consisting of four stretched canvases covered with house paint. When Rauschenberg exhibited more white paintings at Eleanor Ward’s Stable Gallery in September 1953, Barnett Newman—a practitioner of the genre of Hard Edged Abstractionism—commented that “He thinks it’s easy. The point is to do it with paint.” (in Kotz 1990: 79). But the younger Rauschenberg was more in tune with the spirit of the time than Newman, realising that in the wake of the Duchampian Readymade the point of postmodern art is to shift the boundaries of art beyond specific media. Painting would ultimately become reduced to being simply one more colour in an ever-expanding artistic palette.

It was only when the metaphysical implications of abstraction—first evinced in Malevich’s Black Square–began to intermingle with the implications of the Duchampian Readymade that the process of undermining the hegemony of painting would begin. The first significant postmodern elaboration came in 1951 when Robert Rauschenberg created White Painting, consisting of four stretched canvases covered with house paint. When Rauschenberg exhibited more white paintings at Eleanor Ward’s Stable Gallery in September 1953, Barnett Newman—a practitioner of the genre of Hard Edged Abstractionism—commented that “He thinks it’s easy. The point is to do it with paint.” (in Kotz 1990: 79). But the younger Rauschenberg was more in tune with the spirit of the time than Newman, realising that in the wake of the Duchampian Readymade the point of postmodern art is to shift the boundaries of art beyond specific media. Painting would ultimately become reduced to being simply one more colour in an ever-expanding artistic palette.

3 notes

0 notes

"Abstract White Square Subtle Cubism Pattern"
(Kazuya Akimoto Art Museum New Works-paintings- 2005)

"Abstract White Square Subtle Cubism Pattern"
(Kazuya Akimoto Art Museum New Works-paintings- 2005)

1 note

0 notes

untitled by Pablo Klappenbach on Flickr.

untitled by Pablo Klappenbach on Flickr.

0 notes